Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Amachan Dreams in Japan, Pt. 1

I'm excited to finally start this series (yes series because there is much to tell) of Amanda's stories from Japan! I may honestly spread this out to 5 parts or more to make sure I cover everything and so I don't bombard you with a single novel. I collected quite a few pictures while Amanda visited Thanik and I this past weekend, so you will not be lacking in visuals. I'll recount the good times we had during her visit in a separate post. Lastly, I may update this post if I happen to miss out on something this first time around, sooo fair warning?
I don't think there will be any objections to start with the aspect of food. Ah, and you can always click on an image to view it larger. Enjoy!

Desserts from a French restaurant:


Amanda says that dessert portions are usually quite small, sometimes only worth 5 small bites. Perhaps that's a good thing, teaching self restraint and rather forcing you to really enjoy what's in front of you. =)




It is such irony that Amanda actually gained weight (not much) whilst there. She raved about how delicious their food is, no matter where she ate. There is a wonderful variety of sea food in particular (well of course). She did have to ask quite often, "What's this?" 
Indeed the portions are generally [much] smaller than what's expected in the U.S. So what fills them up with smaller portions? Normally the rice that accompanies a great deal of the meals and the green tea or water you have with it. Green tea is often the drink of choice. Yumm. My drink of choice is water when I'm out and at home it's either water or orange juice. 


Amachan brought this treat back for the hubby and I to try. Both of us liked it and Amanda did add that it's best when freshly made. It has just the right amount of sweetness and the texture is---hm, that's a tough one to explain; well, it's nice, haha.


Takoyaki

Taiyaki


There are some general rules, shall we say, when it comes to eating really anywhere.
  • Before eating you give thanks for the food and compliment it, such as, "This looks delicious." Perhaps even if it doesn't look good, be polite about it. Once finished eating, I believe you give your (polite) opinion on how you liked the food.
  • It's impolite to not finish even the last grain of rice. I don't think anyone will be harsh about it, just do your best.

I am not a fan of fast food, but let me take a moment to at least compliment the interior design of (at least one) their McDonalds. If Amanda had not told me it was so, I would have guessed it to be a quaint noodle shop or something of the like. Outside the restroom, they had a sink so you can rinse off your hands, if that's all you needed to do. Hmm, pretty handy.




Here is a small look inside one of their most famous Starbucks (below); I think famous for it's 'different' design. Their outdoor seating is lovely too. They even set out blankets on each chair and mat during the colder season(s).






Below is a picture of a restaurant Amanda and her boyfriend went to in Chinatown. She said the food is delicious and famous as well for a particular Korean actor having dined there before. What a small world, right?
Unlike the U.S., the waiter/waitress does not keep coming back to your table to check how you are doing. Instead, you must signal to them if you are in need of something. I think I'd prefer that method because I've worked in a restaurant and I know that often the waiter/waitress will purposefully check on you right when you've taken a bite. They are tricky that way.





Mystery Man (Amanda's boyfriend) and his family have this particular 'dish' once a year for New Years. I'm not sure if you're only allowed to eat it on New Years, but either way I think most would only eat it once a year because as I'm sure you can tell it's a fairly expensive meal to have. 


Osechi


Below is something not seen too often, something that looks remotely deep-fried or just fried. Thankfully their fried food is not as greasy as American food tends to be. 
Even now perhaps you can tell that Japanese folk eat a greater variety of food in general compared to what people might normally eat in the U.S. A great example to follow (hope that makes sense).


Tonkastu



Who else feels hungry now?

Part II: fashion
Part III: cleanliness
Part IV: misc. adventures
Part V: Disney Sea   

2 comments:

  1. I just had dinner and already feel hungry. Nice food. Looks like a fun place to get my chow on.

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